Types of Korean picnic food

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Types of Korean picnic food

 

Korea is blessed with great seasons and awesome weather in general that people love to do outdoor activities such as hiking and picnicking. Given the abundance of natural wonders and parks available in the country, it is not surprising anymore that a majority of Koreans prefer to spend their quality time with family and friends on picnic grounds. But what is a picnic without all the delicious picnic food? Today we will be giving you a list of typical Korean picnic food items that you should prepare anytime soon:

1. Korean rice rolls (kimbap)

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Kimbap is one typical Korean food item that usually fills most Korean picnic baskets. This finger-lickin’ snack food has a lot of varieties depending on the filling. Egg, vegetables, pork, chicken or basically anything that you want to use as a filling is great for this highly popular picnic food. Enjoy eating this food using your bare hands, which adds more to the fun!

2. Korean dumplings (mandoo)

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Enjoy these bite-sized dumplings that are prepared in a variety of ways: pan-fried, steamed, or boiled. Meat lovers and even vegetarians can rejoice given that mandoos can have a variety of fillings depending on your preference. These dumplings can be added in soups with flavourful broths, and this just means that Korean dumplings is one of the most versatile snacks out there.

3. Korean summer rolls

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Nothing beats the feeling of munching on these Korean spring rolls filed with your choice of meat and vegetables, perilla leaves or kaenip and spicy chilli paste or kochujang. Feel free to stuff these spring rolls with seasoned carrots, cucumbers, lettuce, and other vegetables with your choice plus some bits of chicken, pork, or even shrimp. Make sure that you don’t forget the peanut dipping sauce because the nutty texture and flavour of that sauce just goes perfectly with these spring rolls.

4. Korean rolled egg omelette (gaeran mari)

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This Korean rolled egg omelette (Gaeran Mari) is one of our favourites because it is tasty, filling, and can also be made out of a variety of ingredients. Feel free to add some bits of ham, chicken, bell pepper, carrots and other vegetables that you want into the egg mixture so that the outcome will be a visual feast of omelette rolls that will be just too visually appealing to even be eaten. It also helps that this picnic food is a great source of protein.

5. Korean Potato Salad

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Korean potato salad is just so filling that you wouldn’t even need breads and other carbohydrate-rich food items on the side. The best part about this Korean version of potato salad is not only its creaminess but also the variety of ingredients that you can put in, such as apples, pineapples, carrots, ham and even cheese.

Do you prefer any type of Korean picnic food? We’d love to know. We’d also love to hear from you at Korean BBQ Online, Sydney’s best Korean BBQ online shopping and delivery service. Check us out today!

Why is Korean food healthy?

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Why is Korean food healthy?

 

There’s a reason why Korean cuisine is such a global culinary powerhouse. Not only are most Korean dishes look and taste so balanced given its equal emphasis on lean meat and vegetables, it is also considered as one of the healthiest cuisines in the world. It is also not surprising that South Korea has one of the lowest obesity rates in the world. In today’s article we are featuring some important points that explain why Korean cuisine is widely regarded as healthy

1. Korean dishes feature a diverse variety of vegetables

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Koreans are really fond of incorporating a lot of vegetables into their dishes, regardless of whether they are main dishes or just sides. Cabbages, carrots, cucumbers, bean sprouts, and lettuce leaves, among others, are some of the most common vegetables that you will likely see in a typical Korean dish. Even their meat wraps are made out of leafy greens! Koreans are also fond of almost anything fermented, and this explains why they are just so fond of kimchi. Fermented food items are usually full of good bacteria, nutrients and minerals that help promote good health.

2. Korean dishes use lean meats

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Koreans are not just purely about vegetables because as we all know, a lot of their popular dishes feature a lot of meat in them. However, unlike other cuisines that feature large, fatty chunks of meat, Koreans are fond of using lean cuts of chicken and beef that are generally healthier for the body, particularly for the cardiovascular system. No wonder that heart problems do not really plague Koreans in general!

3. Koreans employ healthy cooking techniques and practices

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You should have noticed by now that Koreans love to ferment, grill, stir-fry and stew in terms of preparing their dishes. These cooking techniques allow the main ingredients of each dish to be cooked in their own juices. This is different to the cooking practices of other countries where obesity rates are high because of their fondness in deep-frying their food. Koreans are also known for not using a lot of preservatives and other artificial substances on their food.

Here’s a list of some health benefits that we are expected to get from eating Korean dishes:

  1. Lower risk for suffering from heart ailments, blood pressure problems, and neurological disorders;
  2. Decreased chance in having cancer because of the regular inclusion of nutritious vegetables;
  3. Healthy internal organs and stronger bones due to protein derived from lean cuts of meat;
  4. Better metabolism and digestion because of the presence of probiotics or good bacteria in a lot of fermented food items
  5. Nicer skin because of minimal usage of preservatives.

Are you now a much bigger fan of Korean cuisine because of the amazing health benefits we provided above? Do let us know in the comments section below how much you appreciate healthy Korean food. And speaking of Korean food, don’t hesitate to visit our website, Korean BBQ Online, today so you can start preparing for a healthy Korean BBQ feast!
 

Injeolmi (Rice Cake) recipe

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Injeolmi (Rice Cake) recipe

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Today we are featuring another highly popular Korean snack that you’ll most likely see in almost any Korean party, banquet or feast. Injeolmi is a type of rice cake that is made out of pounded or steamed rice flour and is shaped into bite-sized pieces. This particular rice cake is coated in dried beans powder that is usually made out of sesame seeds, azuki, or even soybeans. Perhaps you’ve tasted an injeolmi before and you want to satisfy your cravings by making some of your own. Well, here’s a no-fuss, easy-peasy injeolmi recipe that you and the entire family can start doing:

Ingredients

Sweet rice flour (glutinous rice flour)

Salt

Sugar

Roasted soybean powder

 

Directions

  1. Place 1 cup of sweet rice flour, ¼ ts salt, 1 tbs sugar, and ¾ cup of water in a microwavable bowl. Mix it well to make rice cake dough.
  2. Cover it with Saran wrap, and cook it in a microwave oven for 3 minutes.
  3. Mix the hot dough with a wooden spoon for about 20 seconds. Put the Saran wrap back on and cook 1 more minute in the microwave.
  4. Transfer the rice cake dough into a mortar and pound it for about 1 minute (pound 50 times). You’ll make bubbles and then hear the bubbles popping out while you pound, which mean the consistency of the rice cake is just right: chewy and elastic.
  5. Spread ½ cup roasted soybean powder on a cutting board and place your pounded rice cake in the powder. Roll it around a bit to cover it with a light dusting of powder.
  6. Cut into bite size pieces.
  7. Coat each piece of the rice cake with the roasted soy bean powder and transfer to a serving plate.

Sprinkle with sugar when you serve.

Recipe source: http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/injeolmi

What’s your favourite version of injeolmi? Don’t forget to share them on the comments section below. Also, make sure to drop by Korean BBQ Online today for the best Korean BBQ food and equipment that you can ever have here in Sydney! Conveniently place your orders online and we’ll get them delivered straight to your house. Feel free to give us a call today!

5 Drool-worthy Korean Fish Dishes

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5 Drool-worthy Korean Fish Dishes

The bodies of water that surround the Korean peninsula is teeming with marine life that fish and other seafood are already a typical part of a lot of Korean dishes. One of the most important things that you’ll notice in a lot of Korean fish dishes is how fresh the seafood ingredients are and also how well they are cooked. Koreans employ a variety of cooking techniques when preparing their fish meals: fried, braised, steamed, stewed, you name it. Some Koreans even like eating their fish raw. Regardless, they all still taste fresh and delicious. For fish lovers out there, here’s a list of drool-worthy Korean fish dishes that you should not miss out:

1. Mixed Rice with Sashimi (Hwe Dub Bap)

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If you are a fan of eating rice topped with raw fish and spices, then hwe dub bap is going to be one of your favorite Korean fish dishes. This fish dish is also very healthy considering that it has the perfect balance of seafood and seasoned vegetables. You can of course experiment with the ingredients, particularly with the sauces where you can choose whether you want it to be completely spicy or a combination of sweet and spicy. Snapper and tuna are usually the most common types of fish being used for this dish.

2. Pan-Fried Fish (Saeng Sun Jun)

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This is one of the easier fish dishes to make considering that the fish fillets that you’ll be needing will just have to be covered in a coating made out of flour and egg. This is the one of the tastiest dishes that you can prepare particularly for kids. Don’t forget to prepare soy sauce or even a spicy dip on the side depending on your preference.

3. Steamed Skate Fish (Hong Uh Jim)

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Skate fish is one of the freshest kinds of seafood that you will ever taste, and it’s great that steamed skate fish is one of the popular Korean fish dishes out there. The way the skate fish is steamed retains its freshness, thereby making the fish meat more tender and perfect for all kinds of sauces – sweet, mild, or spicy.

4. Halibut Teriyaki

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Another Korean fish dish favorite is the halibut teriyaki, a fuss-free, easy-to-prepare dish that has been introduced by the Japanese to Koreans when Korea was under Japanese rule. The perfect blend of sweet and spicy sauces makes even meat lovers to like a thick chunk of halibut prepared teriyaki-style. You can also choose your own seasoned vegetables and even banchans (tofu or radish) on the side.

5. Broiled Mackerel (Godenguh Gui)

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Koreans are fond of broiling their fish in whole or in half because it makes everything crispy. The head, spine, and tail of the mackerel are removed so that its skin will be the only one to remain in place. This dish is best eaten on its own or as a topping on plain rice. The mackerel is generally a very tender fish so expect it to go well with any sweet-spicy dipping sauce.

Start planning your Korean BBQ feast with Korean BBQ Online. We are the only Korean BBQ delivery in Sydney that offers the finest, the most delicious variety of premium meat. Check out our menu today

 

Five Must-try Korean Noodle Dishes

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Five Must-try Korean Noodle Dishes

Noodle dishes are already a common sight to behold on almost all Korean dining events. We’re pretty sure that you yourself already have your own favourite Korean noodle dishes. Well, we can’t blame you for it because nothing really beats the pleasurable feeling of slurping a fresh bowl of noodles simmered in flavourful broth. Imagine doing this on a hot day or cold night in some authentic Korean restaurant? Oh, that’s just pure bliss! Today we are featuring 5 popular Korean noodle dishes that you should devour when you get the chance:

1. Korean Cold Noodles (Mul Naengmyun)

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Naeng myun (naengmyoen) is made out of cold, buckwheat noodles that is served in a flavourful, slightly sour broth and is topped with vegetables, egg, and sometimes even meat. This is very easy to prepare considering that this noodle dish is considered as a one-bowl meal. And given that this is a cold noodle dish, this comfort food is just your delicious companion during the sweltering summertime.

2. Korean Stir-Fried Noodles (Chapchae)

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One of our personal favourite banchans is chapchae. What is there to not like about this noodle dish? Korean glass noodles that are stir-fried to perfection plus some generous serving of pork and vegetables tossed in? Oh, this is just too mouth-watering. Fortunately, making chapchae right at the comforts of your own home won’t even take away a significant chunk of your time given that its main ingredients are easy to find.

3. Cold Soybean Noodle Soup (Kong Gooksu)

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This cold noodle dish is another great comfort food that is perfect for the hot months. Not only is this noodle dish very easy to prepare (even amateur cooks can whip up an amazing version of kong gooksu), this is also very filling and nutritious that is just popular among the vegans.  We bet that you’ll fall in love with this noodles’ nutty texture as soon as you get to taste it.

4. Spicy Cold Noodles (Bibim Gooksu)

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If you want a noodle version of one of Korea’s national dishes, bibimbap, then Bibim Gooksu is the one you’re looking for. This cold noodle dish just has the right amount of spice to please your palate as it indulges on a filling serving of noodles, egg, seasoned vegetables and meat of your choice.

5. Korean Noodles with Black Bean Sauce (Jajangmyun)

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If there’s one highly popular noodle dish in Korea that should not escape your sensibilities, then that would have to be jajangmyun. This noodle dish is Korea’s answer to the black bean noodle dish of China and is also one of those dishes that perfectly combine the sweetness and tangy taste of its ingredients. This dish is generally cheap yet filling that’s why it’s very common for Koreans to have jajangmyun as a takeout meal.

This list does not cover a ton of other awesome Korean noodle dishes out there. What are your Korean noodle dish favourites? Post them all in the comments section below. And if you’re wishing to celebrate a memorable occasion, then why not host a Korean BBQ party? Korean BBQ Online will deliver to you all the meats, sides and equipment that you need for you to have your own unforgettable Korean BBQ feast. Contact us today and see how we can help!

Cold Korean Food for the Summer

Cold Korean Food for the Summer

Koreans surely do love their spices, but that does not mean that they do not have a wide array of cold dishes that will make the hearts of non-spicy food lovers leap. There is actually a lot of cold Korean comfort food items that one can enjoy during the sweltering summer days. Here are a few of them:

  1. Mixed Rice with Sashimi (Hwe Dub Bap)

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Hwe Dub Bap tastefully combines rice, fresh seafood and spices in one savoury bowl. This dish is best eaten with a sweet-spicy sauce, although you can of course experiment with your own sauce depending on the level of spiciness that you prefer. We personally recommend using salmon and tuna for this dish because these two complement well with a sweet-spicy sauce.

  1. White Kimchi Cold Noodle Soup (Dongchimi Gooksu)

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This refreshing cold noodle soup has a tartly and refreshing taste that is just perfect to excite your taste buds and replenish you on a hot day. There are ready-made dongchimis that you can buy in almost all Asian stores, although there are those who prefer to make the noodles from scratch, which will take approximately 3 days.

  1. Fresh Spring Rolls with Spicy Korean Dipping Sauce

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This Korean version of fresh spring rolls is made out of perilla leaves and Korean pepper paste. The great thing about this dish is that you can stuff your perilla leaves with seafood like shrimp and other vegetables of your choice. We personally love this cold dish not only because it is so nutritiously balanced but it is also a delightful crunchy dish to devour. Don’t forget to pair these spring rolls with a peanut dipping sauce.

  1. Cold Cucumber Soup (Oi Naengguk)

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This refreshing soup, which is sometimes referred to as oi naengchae, is one of the best Korean cold dishes to consume to invigorate your body during the summer months. This is perfectly paired with almost any warm rice meal because of the crispy taste of the cucumbers and cool taste of the soup.

  1. Cold Buckwheat Noodles (Mul Naengmyun)

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Naeng myun is a cold buckwheat noodle dish that combines the decadent flavours of meat, vegetables, egg and a tangy broth. This dish is often consumed by those who live high up in the mountains so that they can better cope with the body effects of living on high altitudes. But now, this cold noodle dish that used to be eaten during the winter months is now a great dish to cap off one’s summer days due to its very refreshing taste.

What are your favourite cold Korean dishes to devour on a typical hot summer day? Don’t forget to spread the word about Korean BBQ Online, your most trusted Korean BBQ online shopping and delivery service that will never let you down. Drop us a line today to see how we can help!

 

Delicious Korean Anjus for your next drinking session

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Delicious Korean Anjus for your next drinking session

We’ve already featured the alcoholic drink soju and how it is considered as Korea’s national drink. We’ve also emphasized the fact that drinking is a big part of Korean culture and how it plays a major role in Korea’s social scene. The act of drinking itself might already be fulfilling, but a typical Korean drinking session will not be complete if anjus or drinking snacks are not served. Just like the famous banchans or side dishes that are being served during a normal Korean BBQ meal, there are different types of anjus that will make every drinking activity more enjoyable. Here are the three types of anjus that you should watch out for:

1. Nut, Fruit and Finger Foods

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Nuts and other forms of salty food are very familiar types of anjus in Korea because of their ability to absorb alcohol and possibly minimize the occurrence of hangover. If Americans have their bowls of popcorns and chips to go with their beers, Koreans have nuts, fresh and dried fruits such lemons, apples, pineapples, persimmon, oranges, crackers, dried squid, dried anchovies, and other salty items.

2. Savory and Fried Foods

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One of the most popular types of anjus are the savoury and fried ones because these food items just go well with soju and most Korean alcoholic beverages in general. These savoury food items are usually Korean fried chicken, pa jun, and Korean blood sausage. Koreans also occasionally serve food items that have been deep-fried in vats of oil to cater to some drinking patrons who prefer to have some grease with what they are drinking.

3. Spicy Dishes and Strong Flavors

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Koreans love their spicy food so much that this type of anju shouldn’t even surprise you anymore. Typical spicy anjus are stir-fried octopus, squid, kimchi with tofu, rice and fish cakes, and many more. Koreans just love the explosion of flavour that these food items will give them, which becomes even more appetizing when they become mixed with alcohol.

What are your personal favourite anjus? Don’t forget to share them with us. And also, do not hesitate to contact Korean BBQ Online to help you with all of your Korean BBQ needs!

Guide to Korean Pojangmacha

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Guide to Korean Pojangmacha

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Today we are going to feature pojangmacha, one of the iconic symbols of Korea’s undying love for food. It’s almost impossible for anyone to not see a pojangmacha in Korea for they are everywhere. Or perhaps you’ve seen some of them already in those Korean movies that you barely understood. Let’s get down to its basics, shall we?

Pojangmacha, or more popularly known as pocha, are outdoor tents that are commonly found along Korean streets and night markets that are set up to accommodate street food and drinking patrons. This Korean term, when translated to English, means covered wagons. Technically speaking, pochas are small eateries that sell a diverse range of Korean street food like kimbap, spicy race cakes, fried rice cake skewers, ice-cream filled waffles, tornado potatoes, and a whole lot more. The characteristics of a pocha almost resemble that of an American food truck if you would like a point of comparison.

There are two types of pocha: those that are set up during the daytime where most of the items being sold are snacks and those that are set up during the evening when most of the drinking sessions happen. The evening pochas are the perfect places to observe how the Koreans down their sojus and makollis, and also to join them for some chill drinking session with some savoury drinking snacks (anjus) on the side. Most of these evening pochas start appearing like mushrooms all throughout the city at around 8 PM or so and would remain in operation even until the wee hours of the morning.

How did the pojangmacha phenomenon start?

Pochas only started appearing in Korea after the country achieved its independence from Japan back in 1945. The set up of pochas back then was very simple – they are just small eateries by the roadside that serve cheap yet filling meals to ordinary workers. Pochas back in the day didn’t have chairs for their patrons because these small eateries were meant to be quick food stops. The owners of these roadside eateries eventually added chairs upon realizing that more and more people preferred to hang out at these eateries longer given the conversations that would usually happen among the patrons. The 1970s saw Korea experiencing a significant economic development, and this period provided the perfect time for pochas to exponentially flourish. The reason for pochas’ increased presence is to meet the demand for cheap yet tasty food, which generally came from the increasing number of workers from various corporations and companies. Pochas just became one of the chillest hang-out spots for a majority of Koreans after going through a long day’s worth of work.

Pojangmacha in modern Korea

There are over 4,000 pochas scattered all throughout Seoul alone. The visibility of pochas throughout the city is widespread considering that the Korean government continues to exert efforts to shut them down because of food and city cleanliness issues. Some of the owners of these pochas also don’t have legal permits to operate. But despite the crackdown efforts and discouraging measures being employed by the Korean government, a lot of locals and foreigners still consider pochas as a colorful part of Korean culture. As many people would say, you haven’t really experienced authentic Korean living until you’ve eaten under one of those colorful outdoor tents.

Have you ever experienced eating pojangmacha food? Tell us all about your experiences!

Meanwhile, if you are craving for some Korean BBQ, then let Korean BBQ Online serve you today. Just order your favourite Korean BBQ meats online and we’ll deliver them to you. Looking forward to hearing from you soon!

Savoury Oxtail Soup (Kkori Gomtang) Recipe

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Savoury Oxtail Soup (Kkori Gomtang) Recipe

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Korean oxtail soup or kkori gomtang is one of those dishes that are usually a part of every Korean’s childhood. This dish that features a very flavourful broth with bones that contain oxtail meat perfectly goes well with sticky rice and some banchans of your choice. People who are fond of this soup know too well that eating it can be messy. You get the bones and slurp them until you chew on the very tender oxtail meat. If the weather is cold and you need something to eat that will make your mornings and evenings warmer, then we suggest you try doing the very easy-to-do oxtail soup recipe below.

INGREDIENTS (serves 4 people)

  • 7, 8 (3 lbs) sections of oxtail
  • 1 bulb of garlic, peeled
  • 1 onion, halved
  • 1 tbsp whole black peppercorns
  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced (green only)
  • salt and pepper (to taste)
  • dangmyun (glass noodles; optional)

PROCEDURE

  1. In a large stock pot, cover the oxtail pieces with water and bring to a rapid boil. Skim off any foam or scum that float to the top. Reduce heat to medium-low and let simmer for an hour minimum, two hours at most. Some water may be added if reduced during this time.
  2. Discard half of the broth and new water (filter or purified water recommended) to desired amount. Add garlic cloves, peppercorns, and onion. Continue to skim off any foam or floating impurities that will continue to appear. Let simmer for 2 hours and let the stove do the work.
  3. At this time, the oxtail meat should literally fall off the bone (or be extremely tender to the touch). Either strain the broth through a cloth into another pot or strain directly from the pot.
  4. Serve the oxtail soup with salt and pepper ready for desired taste. The meaty broth should be clean and refreshing. Sprinkle scallions and serve with rice and side dishes.

*Most Koreans soak the oxtail pieces in water for an hour to remove blood and impurities, but I skip this step to save time (but without sacrificing taste). The oxtail pieces get cooked long enough to remove any impurities or “bad blood.”

**Koreans love eating every bit of the oxtails, including the gelatinous and semi-crunchy end caps of the bone. During childhood I didn’t fancy this part too much and gave them to the parents (which they were more than happy to oblige eating), but ironically I find myself looking forward to them.

Source of recipe: http://www.grouprecipes.com/132707/gori-gomtang-korean-oxtail-soup.html

Don’t forget to order oxtail soup in your next Korean BBQ restaurant adventure! But if you have you want to have an authentic Korean BBQ experience at home, then Korean BBQ Online is here to help you make it reality. Top-notch quality Korean BBQ meats, sides and equipment delivered straight to you. Contact us today!

Easy-Peasy Kimchi Recipe

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Easy-Peasy Kimchi Recipe

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We already know what kimchi is – it’s the ultimate and most ubiquitous side of dish of Korea. As they say, a Korean meal is not complete if there is no generous serving of kimchi on the side. We also revealed in another article that kimchi is so distinctly embedded in Korean culture that Koreans even buy a separate fridge just for it!

There are a lot of kimchi varieties out there (and you can make your own version of kimchi as well), but the recipe below is for your typical pungent and tasty napa cabbage kimchi. You might actually be surprised as to how easy it is to make your own kimchi at home. Let’s get started!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 head napa cabbage (baechu, Chinese cabbage, wombok)
  • ½ onion, thin sliced
  • ¼ carrot, thin julienne
  • ¼ Korean radish (muwoo), thin julienne
  • 4 green onions (spring onions), cut into 3-cm pieces
  • 2 tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tsp minced ginger
  • ½ cup go choo ga roo (Korean chili powder)
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • ½ cup sea salt (or any coarse salt)
  • 1 cup water
  • ¼ cup jeot gal (Korean fish sauce)

PROCEDURE

  1. Quarter the napa cabbage, wash and drain.
  2. Mix ½ cup sea salt (or any coarse salt) and 1 cup water.
  3. Put cabbages in a salted water and take out one at a time to get salt down.
  4. In a container, add cabbages and pour salted water, set aside for at least 6–8 hours (overnight will be great).
  5. The cabbage should be soft enough to bend.
  6. Wash, drain well.
  7. Mix together ½ cup go choo ga roo (Korean chili powder), 2 tsp salt, 1 tbsp sugar, ¼ cup jeot gal (Korean fish sauce), 2 tbsp minced garlic, and 1 tsp minced ginger.
  8. Mix in vegetables to the chilli powder mixture.
  9. Take one cabbage, stuff in above mixture to every layer. Try to fold in half. (must)
  10. With 2 outer leaves, wrap the whole thing securely.
  11. Put it in a airtight container.
  12. Let it sit on a kitchen counter for overnight.
  13. Put in a refrigerator for 2–3 days. (optional)
  14. Serve with rice. (optional)

Source of recipe: https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cookbook:Kimchi

The recipe above is so easy to make, but if in case you don’t have the time to make your own kimchi, the Korean BBQ Online has your back. We deliver the best-quality kimchi that you will ever taste straight to your doorstep. Give us a try today!

5 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Korean BBQ

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5 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Korean BBQ

You may have heard or read a lot about Korean BBQ already, or perhaps you’ve already spent some of your most memorable lunches and dinners in a Korean BBQ restaurant. However, there might still be a few things that you do not know about Korean BBQ. Not convinced? Well, allow us to dish out 5 facts that might just make you fall in love with Korean BBQ goodness even more:

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1. Let’s have Gogigui!

Koreans call Korean BBQ as gogigui, which when translated to English means “roasting meat”. So impress your Korean loved ones and friends next time when you invite them to a Korean BBQ feast at your house next time. You now have a brand new term for Korean BBQ to use!

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2. Korean BBQ is all about balance

One of the best characteristics of Korean BBQ is the way it emphasizes balance. A typical Korean BBQ meal set, for example, might appear heavy on meat, but then you will eventually notice the vegetable banchans that are served on the side. Another example is that in traditional Korean cuisine, pork is considered as a “cold” food even though it is hot when you eat it. To balance out the taste, people then add some “hot” ingredients like chilli or even chives to spice up the flavour.

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3. The amount of banchans served reflects status symbol

Korean BBQ meals are not complete without banchans, those delectable side dishes that range from brussels sprouts to tofu. According to a lot of Korean foodies, the number of banchans served in a typical meal emphasizes the status symbol shared among the meal partakers. If you will get an experience in a lifetime and have a Korean BBQ meal with an ambassador or dignitary, then expect more than 20 banchans to be served on your table. There are some reports that say that a Korean meal with a king would entail at least 100 banchans. Imagine seeing that many side dishes? A Korean BBQ lunch or dinner with your boss or with the parents of your future spouse or wife would usually require more than five.

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4. Rice paper wraps are in!

Of course we are well too familiar with shiso and lettuce leaves as the ones we use as wraps whenever we eat our delicious serving of samgyeopsal. However, there’s an emerging trend lately where Korean BBQ diners use rice paper as their preferred wrap for their Korean BBQ meat. If you want to try something new with the way you eat your Korean BBQ, then give rice paper wraps a try and see how it will suit you!

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5. Vegetarian Korean BBQ

So you do not eat meat? Don’t fret because vegetarians like you can still enjoy the awesomeness of Korean BBQ without having the need to down those pieces of grilled pork and beef. How does grilled eggplants, squash, potatoes, peppers and other types of vegetables sound to you? Fresh vegetables are also often served as side dishes in a typical Korean BBQ meal so being a vegetarian should not stop you from enjoying the communal joy and satisfaction that a Korean BBQ experience delivers.

Do you have other uncommon Korean BBQ facts that you wish us to know? Spill them all below. As always, Korean BBQ Online is here to address all of your Korean BBQ needs. Give us call or shoot us an email today so we can help you achieve the best Korean BBQ experience ever.

3 things to consider when you cook meat Korean BBQ Style

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3 Things to Consider When You Cook Meat Korean BBQ-style

Meat lovers surely do enjoy partaking in Korean BBQ feasts, and they can’t be blamed for it given the amount of pork bellies and beef ribs that are involved in the process. But that doesn’t automatically mean that we all know everything that there is when it comes to cooking meat the Korean BBQ way. For today’s article we have compiled three things that everyone should pay attention to when grilling meat in a typical Korean BBQ feast. Aren’t we all for saving time and making sure that our Korean BBQ meats taste so fantastically awesome?

1. Consider the cut

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Traditional Korean cuts are served in thicker chunks and will take longer time to cook. On the other hand, LA-style cuts are usually thinly sliced. It is always recommended that you start cooking the thinly sliced meats, particularly bulgogi, because they obviously cook faster. Also, good cuts make up for best-tasting meat. For example, an outstanding cut of beef is the secret to having a savoury serving of bulgogi. If you don’t have the budget to purchase premium cuts of meat, then just look for marbled beef or those that have high visibility white flecks of fat to have more tender pieces of meat.

2. Consider the marinade

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If you prepare your marinade well and you marinate your BBQ meats properly, then expect a tremendous heap of praise from your Korean BBQ feast peers. Typical ingredients for a Korean BBQ marinade are soy sauce, water, onions, garlic, and sugar. But of course you can experiment and do your own secret marinades to impress your loved ones’ foodie hearts. The length of time to marinate the meat depends on how thick the meat is. Three to four hours is enough for meats that are 4-5 mm thick. Any cut of meat that is thicker than 5 mm will usually take 6 hours or more (sometimes, even overnight). Thinly sliced meats that must be marinated overnight would often require a marinade that has equal parts soy sauce and water.

3. Consider the smoke

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Korean BBQ is definitely a fun communal experience, but smoke coming from the BBQ grill can be bothersome for many. Although a lot of people believe that grilling over charcoal produces the best-tasting meats, too much inhalation of charcoal smoke can lead to carbon monoxide poisoning. Fortunately, there are hot plates with portable gas stoves that are available that will make your Korean BBQ feasts still fun but without the smoke.

Do you have other tips to share to everyone when cooking meat the Korean BBQ way? Post them as comments below. Don’t forget to check out Korean BBQ Online today, your best source of top-quality Korean BBQ meats and equipment in Sydney!

LA-style Galbi vs. Korean-style Galbi

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LA-style Galbi vs. Korean-style Galbi

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You may all know now what galbi is and perhaps you’ve already ordered some in a Korean BBQ restaurant. But do you know that there are two popular styles of galbi? You may have noticed in some Korean restaurants or even in some supermarkets that they are offering LA and Korean style galbis. But what exactly are they and what are their distinguishing characteristics? For today’s article we are going to give you a quick comparative overview of these two styles of galbi:

Dimensions

Korean style galbi are beef spare ribs that are approximately 3-4 inches tall and are cut long and thin to make a flap. The resulting flaps are sometimes wrapped around the ribs for around three to five times. On the other hand, LA Style galbi or beef short ribs are usually 3-4 inches tall and 5-7 inches long. The thickness usually varies between 1/4-1/3 inches.

Cutting and preparation

Korean-style galbi is portioned in segments across the rib bones and is thicker, whereas the LA-style galbi is cut through the rib bone, thereby resulting in the appearance of 3 eyes of rib bones. In other words, the Korean-style is cut parallel whereas the LA-style is cut perpendicular to the bone. As a result, the LA style is generally more tender and thinner, thereby allowing the marinade to penetrate into the meat more quickly. It is also much quicker to cook Korean-style galbis on a grill given its thinness.

Given that Korean-style galbi is thicker, chefs in galbi restaurants take more considerable time in cutting the meat because of the amount of effort that must be put in to get the meat’s desired dimensions. This also explains why traditional style galbis are generally more expensive than LA-style galbis in light of the more intensive work required in producing the cuts. On the other hand, LA-style galbis do not really require that much slicing because all that usually needs to be done is for the bone pieces and excess fats to be rinsed.

Despite the differences in the dimensions and the way the meats are being cut and prepared, it is known that Korean and LA-style galbis taste the same when marinated and grilled.

Which type of galbi do you prefer and why? We want to know Feel free to leave us a comment. And regardless of the kind of galbi that you want, Korean BBQ Online delivers. Check out our website today and experience how easy it is to get your Korean BBQ meats delivered to your doorstep.

Korean dishes to try in Sydney

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Korean dishes to try in Sydney

You don’t really need to go to Korea (at least for now) to enjoy outstanding Korean dishes. In our bustling city of Sydney alone, there is already plenty of Korean restaurants that can satisfy your Korean food cravings. So if you are planning on a Korean food adventure anytime soon, then we hope that our list below of must-try Korean dishes will help you decide on which Korean dishes will give the best value for your money:

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1. Bibimbap

Korea’s most famous rice bowl can be enjoyed outstandingly right here in Sydney! Seriously, who can resist of bowl of steamed rice topped with warm and tender beef and an assortment of savoury vegetables? “Bibim” actually means “to mix” in English, so go ahead and mix your bowl of bibimbap so you can feel the explosion of flavour that each ingredient provides. Some great Sydney places where you can order delicious bowls of bibimbap are Bibim, to Mix and Moon Park.

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2. Mul Naengmyeon

This dish is for noodle lovers who want to enjoy a bowl of cold noodles  that are served in a tasty broth. You want to promote healthy digestion and cleanse your palate? Then this Korean dish is for you. Boiled egg, cucumber, Asian pear, and radish are the typical ingredients that you will see in this noodle dish, which is just perfect to consume on a hot and summery day. Don’t forget to add some mustard oil or vinegar to further enhance the flavours. If you are suddenly craving now for a great bowl of mul naengmyeon, then you can head out to Poong Nab Dong and HanYang Galbi.

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3. Bossam

Bossam is a pork belly dish that is cooked in spices and is served in thin slices. A lot of Korean foodies consistently rate bossam as one of the must-tries in Korean cuisine because of its savory tenderness and juicy flavor. And of course, what’s a Korean dish without its awesome sides? Bossam is often served with fermented shrimp, kimchi, oyster radish, onion and garlic. And just before you use those chopsticks, allow us to tell you how you down this piece of awesomeness: you get your pork belly and the sides, wrap them all together in your choice of vegetable leaves, which are usually cabbage or lettuce, and then devour.  Kim Restaurant and Maroo Korean Barbecue Restaurant are just a couple of dining spots where you can try great-tasting bossams.

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4. Korean fried chicken

Chicken is of course one of our most favourite comfort food, and nothing beats the glorious taste of a crispy and finger-lickin’ Korean fried chicken. Korean fried chicken is already so good on its own that you don’t even need to put sauce on it sometimes. Foreigners are also raving about Korean friend chicken because it has a light taste and is not too greasy. This dish is best eaten with some banchans such as radish cubes which just perfectly complement the taste of this fried goodness. Feel free to get your Korean fried chicken fix from food joints like Red Pepper, Beshico, Gallus Gallus and Jeans Chilli Chicken. You won’t be disappointed! 

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5. Samgyeopsal

Samgyeopsal is one of those pork belly dishes that you will almost always see in any Korean BBQ feast. What can we say – Koreans love their pork so much! The cuts for this meat are much thicker and are often served uncooked and unmarinated. This means that you will be doing all of the grilling and portioning of the cuts into smaller pieces so that they will be cooked evenly and thoroughly. You can order excellent samgyeopsal from food places like 678 and Jang Ta Bal.

We know that a lot of you are foodies, so please let us know your favourite Korean dishes that you managed to try here in Sydney. And if you wish to enjoy Korean BBQ right at the comforts of your own home, then always remember that Korean BBQ Online is here to deliver.

5 Korean Food Blogs You Must Check Out Today

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5 Korean Food Blogs You Must Check Out Today

Nothing beats the feeling of being introduced to Korean cuisine than going to websites that feature mouth-watering pictures of various beautifully plated Korean dishes. These informative websites are also excellent resources of a wide array of Korean dish recipes, cooking tips and Korean culture insights that will make you feel as if you are in Korea yourself. If you’re only starting to get to know Korean cuisine in general, then we made a list of awesome Korean food blogs that should do the job:

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1. Seoul Eats

Seoul Eats is one of the most comprehensive Korean food blogs out there that not only feature various Korean dishes and recipes but almost everything that is to know about Korea. Planning on a holiday in Seoul? Itching to know some customer reviews about Korean restaurants? Hoping to get tips on how understand Koreans better? Not knowing what to prepare for your next Korean lunch? Daniel Gray, who manages this website, has gotten you covered.

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2. Eat Your Kimchi

Another excellent resource about Korean food and life in general is Eatyourkimchi by Simon and Martina. Just like Seoul Eats, this website goes beyond featuring appetizing Korean meat cuts, stews, banchans and other dishes. It also gives its readers an insight into the Korean psyche by posting content related to Kpop, Korean way of life, treasure finds, personal experiences of living in Korea and everything else that will make you fall in love with everything and anything Korean even more.

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3. My Korean Kitchen

The passion of food blogger Sue just explodes on her website, My Korean Kitchen. On this website Sue makes an effort to provide people with an authentic way of experiencing Korean food and culture through her picture-based posts and instructional videos, all of which should get you up to speed in creating your own Korean dish creations. She’s also generous in sharing various tips and insights when one goes to travel or even live in Korea.

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4. Aeri’s Kitchen

Aeri of Aeri’s Kitchen loves to cook, and she does so well in letting her fans know through her own website, or should we say, kitchen. Aside from the amazing Korean dish features and fusion recipes (Western and traditional) that she posts regularly, she is also outstanding in providing some tutorials for people who are interested to learn the Korean language. How’s that for combining your interests in languages and food?

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5. Maangchi

Maangchi is one globally popular Korean food blog that it now has a solid community of followers from all over the world. One of the most popular features of this site is its forum where members can just join the community and start interacting with other members. Got a question about Korean way of life? Not sure what particular cooking item or meat cut to buy? Go to Maangchi and get your questions answered. In general, this site not only features authentic Korean cooking but also real Korean food and culture enthusiasts who will be with you in your journey towards appreciating and loving Korea even more.

Do you visit other Korean food blogs or websites that we didn’t get to include in our list above? Share them all below in the comments for our readers’ benefit. And once again, we thank you for visiting our blog here at Korean BBQ Online! Now you know who to contact for your Korean BBQ needs!

5 Stew-Licious Korean Stews To Try!

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5 Stew-licious Korean Stews to try


Stews play a major role in Korean cuisine as it is almost always a part of any Korean meal. And no, these stews do not always just stay on the side – they sometimes even take the starring role. In this article we have compiled a list of 5 mouth-watering Korean stews that must be a part of your Korean BBQ feasts or your Korean dining experience in general:

 

  1. Doenjang jjigae (된장찌) – (Korean Bean Paste) Stew
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Think of Japanese miso but with a bolder flavour and stronger odour. This is exactly what Korean Bean Paste Stew is, a comfort yet nutritious food that will help you get through the coldness of the winter. Feel free to use your top choice of vegetables when you make this stew. Common choices are turnips, carrots, zucchini, and pumpkin. Eating this stew during Korean BBQ feasts is also great as it will prepare your body from all the meats that you will consume.

 

  1. Kimchi jjigae (김치찌개)– Spicy Kimchi Stew
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Those who are not afraid of hotness can indulge merrily in the spicy kimchi stew. Just like the Korean Bean Paste Stew, this comfort food is perfect to consume during the winter season given its spiciness. If you want to give your taste buds that explosion of flavour just before you partake in a Korean BBQ feast, then this stew will definitely fail you.

 

  1. Mae un tang (매운탕)– Korean Spicy Fish Stewmae un tang

If you want a delicious combination of fish, vegetables, and spices into one dish, then this Korean Spicy Fish Stew will be a boon to your palate. The spiciness of this stew is neutralized by the sweet taste of the fish and vegetables, which makes it just perfect for a balanced stew.

 

  1. Samgyetang (삼계탕) – Korean Stuffed Chicken Soup with Ginsengsamgyetang

Meat lovers will definitely rejoice once they get a taste of this stew. Sticky rice-stuffed chicken simmered into perfection in garlic, ginseng, and ginger almost makes this stew a meal in itself. It also doesn’t help that this stew is not only delicious; it’s also fragrant. What a way to whet your appetite!

 

  1. Bulgogi jjigae (불고기찌개) – Korean Bulgogi Stewbulgogi jeonggol

This stew is one of the easiest ones to make especially if you just finished hosting a Korean BBQ feast and you have some leftover marinated bulgogi. Throw in some vegetables like carrots, pumpkin, zucchini or whatever other vegetable you want into the mix and you already have another balanced stew that will surely get your energy going for the next day.

What kinds of Korean stews would you recommend for us to try during the holidays?

Korean BBQ Online – Launched!

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Welcome to the newly launched Korean BBQ online store! All of your favourite cuts of Korean BBQ meats can be found here, and delivered straight to your homes. With our amazingly tender, juicy, savory, and outstandingly delicious meat, it will keep you coming back for more!

If you have any request at all such as specified meat cuts, please let us know as we are very versatile and can handle it without any problem. We assure you that every customer is special, and requests are always taken care of with the best effort, so feel free to contact us!

We intend on using this blog section of the site to bring you our favourite Korean food recipes, discuss Korean culture, and anything else that we fancy at the time. So stay tuned and enjoy the shopping in the meantime!